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UNO Spinoff Variant Games: The Complete List

UNO Spinoff Variant Games: The Complete List

Originally created back in 1971 by Merle Robbins, the card game UNO is one of the more popular card games ever created. A twist on the public domain game Crazy Eights, UNO is a game that almost everyone has played at least once in their lives. The basic premise of the game is to try and get rid of all of your cards as quickly as possible. To play a card it has to either match the number/symbol or color of the last card played. When you are down to only one card make sure you say “UNO” or you will have to draw additional cards. With the popularity of the original game, it should not be surprising that Mattel has created a lot of different UNO spinoff games over the years.

While most people are quite familiar with the original UNO, you may be surprised by how many different UNO games have been created. Instead of looking at the original UNO I thought it would be more interesting to look at some of the more obscure games in the UNO franchise which include the spinoff games and the themed decks.

Like a lot of popular board games, the owners of the UNO brand have tried to cash in on the popularity of the game. While most of the UNO games just involve a new theme being added to the game (see our complete list of UNO themed decks), there have actually been a surprising number of games designed using the UNO theme that actually differ from the original UNO. Most of these games add a new mechanic/contraption to UNO while others take the UNO theme and apply it to another type of game. Listed below are all of the UNO spinoff games released over the years that actually tried to change the main UNO gameplay in a significant way.

Blokus Shuffle: UNO Edition

  • Year: 2021
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Nick Hayes, Bernard Tavitian
  • Genre: Abstract, Tile Placement
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy: 

Description: Blokus Shuffle: UNO Edition is basically what you would get if you combined Blokus with the action cards of UNO. Before playing one of your tiles, you will play an action card similar to those found in UNO such as Skip, Reverse, Draw 2, etc.

Box for DOS

DOS

  • Year: 2018
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Nick Hayes
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy: 

Description: DOS is basically the unofficial sequel to UNO as it even follows the same naming convention. Many of the gameplay mechanics are the same, but there are a few differences. In the game there are two different discard piles that you can play off of. To play a card it either has to match the number of the top card on one of the discard piles, or a player can play two cards that add up to the number on top of one of the discard piles. If a player also matches the color they will receive a bonus. A player is allowed to play a card(s) to both piles if possible. If a player can’t play a card(s) they will draw a card from the draw pile. The objective of the game is to get rid of all of the cards from your hand. Instead of calling out UNO when you only have one card left, you will say DOS when you have two cards left. The winner of a hand will score points from the cards left in the other players’ hands.

Mini Review: I have a lot of mixed feelings about DOS. It shares quite a bit in common with UNO, and yet it feels a lot different as well. There are some things that I think it does better and other things that I think it does worse. The game has a much greater emphasis on numbers as all cards that are played must include numbers that match. This adds some interesting elements to the game. The fact that you can combine cards to make a match and even possibly play to both piles makes it much easier to get rid of cards. This adds some strategy to the game and makes rounds move quicker. It also adds quite a bit of luck though as rounds end too quickly and there is little player interaction. DOS has a lot of potential and yet it feels like it kind of wastes it without some house rules. Without house rules I think DOS is worse than UNO, but I can see some people enjoying it more. Check out our review of DOS for more information.

Box for UNO All Wild!

UNO All Wild!

  • Year: 2021
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Nick Hayes
  • Genre: Card, Family
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy: 

Description: What would you get if every card in UNO was wild? Well that is basically the premise behind UNO All Wild!. Every single card in the deck is wild so you no longer have to worry about matching color, number or symbol. You basically play one of the cards from your hand and then take the corresponding action. The player who gets rid of all of their cards first wins the game.

Mini Review: UNO All Wild! in some ways feels like a joke version of UNO. As you can play any card at any time, there is no need to match the previously played card. Instead the entire game is built around using the card’s special abilities to get rid of your cards before the other players. Basically the game is about preventing the other players from going out before you. The game is easy to play and one of those that you can just enjoy without putting much thought into what you are doing. It probably relies on even more luck than the original game though. If you think the premise sounds interesting and you don’t mind that the game is far from serious, it may be worth checking out UNO All Wild!

UNO All Wild! Rules and Review

UNO Attack

UNO Attack! AKA UNO Extreme

  • Year: 1999
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Attack! takes the gameplay of traditional UNO and adds in a card shooter. Whenever a player can’t play a card they must press the button on the card shooter. This may trigger the machine to shoot out some cards. Any cards that the machine shoots out the player who pressed the button has to add to their hand. In addition to the machine the game includes a couple unique cards:

  • Hit 2: Press the button twice and take any cards that are shot out.
  • Trade Hands: The player who plays the card can trade their hand with any other player.
  • Discard All: Discard all of the cards matching the color of the discard all card.
  • Wild All Hit: Each player takes turns pressing the button until cards shoot out of the machine.
  • Wild Hit-Fire: The next player has to keep pressing the button until cards are shot out of the machine.

Mini Review: UNO Attack! plays pretty similarly to the original game. The main difference is that instead of drawing cards, you press buttons on the launcher which determines whether you get cards and how many you will receive. The launcher is kind of silly and it is fun to see one of your opponents get stuck with a lot of cards. It adds even more luck to the original game though. Basically if you like UNO and think the idea of a machine randomly shooting out cards sounds interesting, it might be worth checking out UNO Attack!.

UNO Attack! Rules and Review

UNO Bingo

  • Year: 1997
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Childrens
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 6+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Bingo is not surprisingly a combination of UNO with Bingo. The players roll dice which determines which number is called. Otherwise the game is played exactly like normal Bingo. The first player to cover all of the spots in a line wins the game.

UNO Blast

  • Year: 2012
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-6
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Blast is played like normal UNO except for the card blaster and some new cards. When a player is unable to play a card they draw a card like normal. Instead of adding the card to their hand, they put the card into one of the slots of the card blaster. If placing the card triggers the blaster, the player has to take all of the cards that were shot out. The special cards in the game include the following:

  • Draw One: The next player draws the top card from the draw pile and has to insert it into the card blaster.
  • Discard Color: The player who plays the card can discard all of the cards they have of the corresponding color.
  • Wild Blast: The next player has to keep drawing cards and placing them in the blaster until the blaster shoots out cards.

UNO Blitzo Game

UNO Blitzo

  • Year: 2000
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Electronic
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Blitzo is a combination of UNO with an electronic game like Simon. On a player’s turn the game unit will give you a command of what “card” you are supposed to play. If you have the correct card you press the corresponding button as quick as possible. If you press the wrong button or take too long, the game unit will give you a punishment. If the instant UNO sound plays during your turn, you can hit the UNO button to get rid of all but one of your cards. The first player to get rid of all of their cards first wins the game.

Mini Review: UNO Blitzo is an interesting take on your traditional UNO game. The game basically take the traditional UNO gameplay and streamlines it to work as an electronic game. In some ways it kind of feels like UNO was combined with a game like Bop-It. This works in some ways. The streamlining allows the game to move quickly. This keeps the game interesting as it is fun trying to follow the directions as quickly as possible. Your reaction time will definitely be tested in the game. People who like these type of electronic games will probably have fun with UNO Blitzo. For streamlining the original UNO though the game has a higher learning curve than you would expect. It takes some time to figure out what buttons you are supposed to press in certain situations. Like the original UNO the game also relies on a quite a bit of luck as your skill won’t be able to overcome bad luck. Check out our full review of UNO Blitzo for more information.

UNO Choo-Choo

  • Year: 2011
  • Publisher: Fischer Price, Mattel
  • Genre: Card, Children’s
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 3+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Choo-Choo is an UNO game designed for preschoolers. The game includes a train component which dispenses the cards when you press on the smokestack. Players need to either match the color of the boxcar or the animal on the previously played card. For special cards UNO Choo-Choo includes both a draw one and a wild card. The first player to get rid of all of their cards first wins the game.

UNO Colors Rule!

  • Year: 2016
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Colors Rule includes four color pawns which correspond to four different special powers. The red power lets a player give all of their red cards to another player at any time. The blue power lets a player play two card on their turn. The green power lets a player immediately play the card they drew even if it doesn’t match the top card on the discard pile. The yellow power lets a player avoid any skip, reverse, draw 2, wild draw 4 and red character cards played against you. Players will gain one of the powers when they play the corresponding special wild card.

Box for UNO Dare!

UNO Dare!

  • Year: 2014
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card, Family
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Dare! is what you get if you combined UNO with Truth or Dare. The game includes Dare cards which have a number printed on them. You will reference the number from the card to the chosen set of dares for the game. The next player in turn order has to complete the associated dare or they will have to draw two cards. Complete Rules

Mini Review: UNO Dare! is basically exactly what I expected it to be. Most of the game plays exactly the same as every other UNO game. Occasionally one of the players have to complete a dare (usually silly actions as the game is family friendly) in order to avoid drawing cards. I can see the game’s appeal for people that like silly dare games, but it wasn’t for me. The dares didn’t really add much to the game in my opinion and when they did my group wasn’t really into doing them. If an UNO game with silly dares in it sounds like something that you would enjoy though, I think you should consider checking it out. Full Review

UNO Dice (1987)

  • Year: 1987
  • Publisher: International Games, Mattel
  • Designer: Merle Robbins (1987)
  • Genre: Dice
  • Number of Players: 2-6
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: As it is not uncommon for popular board games to be turned into dice games it is not surprising that UNO Dice has had a number of different versions created over the years. Most of these versions are quite different as well. The 1987 version of the game features three different games that you can play with the dice. The first involves rolling dice and playing them to a tray where they match the color or number of a previously played dice. The second game is a Yahtzee/Yacht variant where you roll five dice and try to roll different combinations. In the third game you will roll dice and place them next to other dice that match the number, color or letter. The dice will score points based on the neighboring dice in the tray.

Box for UNO Dice

UNO Dice (1996)

  • Year: 1996
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Dice
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: Each player takes five dice to start the game and one of the dice is rolled and placed in the center of the table. At the beginning of a player’s turn they look at their current dice to see if one matches the color, number or command on the center dice. If one of their dice matches they will add it to the center of the table and the previous center die is returned to the bag. If none of their dice match the center dice they will roll all of their dice, and if any of these new dice match they can be played. If they still don’t have a match they will draw a die from the bag and roll it. Any rolled match can immediately be played. Otherwise the rest of the game is played mostly the same as the original game which includes the special actions. The first player to get rid of all of their dice will score points from the other player’s dice. The first player to score the designated number of points wins the game.

Mini Review: The 1996 version of UNO Dice is mostly what you would expect out of a UNO dice game. The game basically takes the traditional UNO gameplay and converts it into a dice game with only a few minor differences. Therefore your opinion of the 1996 version of UNO Dice will likely depend on your opinion of the original UNO as well as the idea of turning it into a dice game. For the most part it works pretty well as the transition to dice is pretty seamless. The game plays quickly and is easy to play. The addition of being able to see the other player’s dice also adds an interesting strategic element to the game. In a lot of ways the game doesn’t differentiate itself much from the original game though. For more information about the game check out our full review of UNO Dice.

Box for UNO Dice

UNO Dice (2011)

  • Year: 2011
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Dice
  • Number of Players: 2
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: Like the 1996 version of the game the 2011 version of UNO Dice follows many of the same mechanics as the original game. Players are given a number of dice at the beginning of the game with one dice being placed on the table to start the game. On a player’s turn they will check to see if one of their current dice either matches the color, number or symbol of the previously played dice. If a dice matches they will add the dice to the line of dice on the table. If the player does not have a match they will take the die at the back of the line and add it to the rest of their dice. They will then roll all of their dice. If they can now play one of their dice they will add it to the end of the line of dice. The players will take turns until one player plays their last die. They will score points for the other player’s dice that they weren’t able to play. The first player to score a certain amount of points wins the game.

Mini Review: In a lot of ways the 2011 version of UNO Dice is the same as the 1996 version. Both games basically turn the card game into a dice game. The gameplay is for the most part the same as the original card game. The 2011 version of the game is quick to play and easy to learn. You can have some fun with the game. There are two main differences between the 1996 and the 2011 versions of the game. The two games have different special dice. The biggest difference though is that the 2011 version only supports two players. This is the main reason why the 2011 version is inferior to the 1996 version. Only having two players in the game is less fun and it creates some issues for the game’s strategy. Of the two I would highly recommend the 1996 version over the 2011 version. Check out our full review of UNO Dice for more information.

Box for UNO Dice Game Roll and Write

UNO Dice Game Roll & Write (2019)

  • Year: 2019
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Emmorie Jossie
  • Genre: Dice
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: The 2019 version of UNO Dice is what is referred to as a roll and write dice game. Each player is given their own board and marker. The objective of the game is to fill in all of the spaces on your board. On a player’s turn they will roll all six of the dice. They also have the option to re-roll the dice if they don’t like the result. Starting with the number written down from your last turn you will try to form a chain from the dice that you rolled. Each dice in the chain must either match the number or color of the previous die in the chain. Once you have finished your chain, write down the numbers from your dice chain onto your board. Then call out the number and color of the last dice in the chain. Any other player whose last space matches this dice can fill in the next space with this number. The special symbols give you various benefits to help yourself or hurt your opponents. The first player to fill in their entire board wins the game.

Mini Review: UNO Dice Game Roll & Write doesn’t have much in common with the original game. Basically the only thing that is the same is the idea of matching numbers and colors. Instead the game plays more like your typical roll and write game. The game is easy to play and plays rather quickly.  You can enjoy the game if you don’t put too much thought into it. It is on the basic side as there is little strategy and a pretty high reliance on luck. If you are looking for a simple roll and write dice game that has a slim connection to UNO, it may be worth checking out UNO Dice Game Roll & Write.

UNO Dice Game Roll & Write Review and Rules

UNO: Disney

  • Year: 2002
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Merle Robbins
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: The game includes a special Tinkerbell card tray. The button on the tray is used when a player uses one of the special action cards. When a draw two card is played the player who played the card chooses a color and if it matches the color chosen by the tray the player can choose which player draws the two cards. If a draw four card is played all of the players have to play a card that matches the color chosen by the tray or they have to draw four cards. When a player plays a wild discard card, the player gets to discard all of the cards from their hand that matches the color chosen by the tray.

Uno Dominoes Box

UNO Dominos

  • Year: 1986
  • Publisher: International Games, Mattel
  • Genre: Tile Laying
  • Number of Players: 2-6
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Dominos is basically UNO meets Dominoes. Players take turns playing a domino next to another domino that either matches the number or color. The special dominoes have the same effects as their card counterparts. The first player to get rid of all of their dominoes first wins the game and collects points from the tiles that the other players still have in their hands.

Mini Review: Basically the name of UNO Dominos tells you everything you need to know about the game. It is basically what you would get if you turned the card game into a tile laying game. Not being a huge fan of Dominoes I wasn’t a big fan of UNO Dominos. I felt that it was too easy to place dominoes and the game relied too much on luck. If you like UNO and Dominoes though, it might be the game for you. Check out our full review of UNO Dominos for more information.

Box for UNO Flash

UNO Flash

  • Year: 2007
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Tyler Kenney
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 3-6
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: In UNO Flash the main gameplay remains the same as the original UNO. The unique mechanic in UNO Flash is the electronic component. Instead of going clockwise/counterclockwise, the electronic component randomly chooses which player gets to play the next card. All action cards apply to the next player chosen by the electronic component. Play quickly though because if you don’t finish your turn in time you have to draw two cards. The game also includes one unique card, Slap. When the slap card is played all players race to press their button with the last player to press their button being forced to draw two cards.

Mini Review: In some ways I was surprised by UNO Flash and in other ways I was disappointed. I have to say that adding a speed element to UNO actually adds more to the game than I was expecting. The speed mechanic really speeds up the game and just adds a level of excitement that you don’t really find in other UNO games. The problem is that the electronic component adds even more luck to the UNO formula. I think the game also could have done more to fully utilize the electronic component. Even though it is not perfect I would still consider UNO Flash to be one of the better UNO spinoff games that I have played. If you are interested in playing UNO with a speed mechanic I think you will like UNO Flash. Check out our full review of UNO Flash for more information.

Box for UNO Flex!

UNO Flex!

  • Year: 2022
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card, Family
  • Number of Players: 2-8
  • Age Recommendations: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Flex! is an interesting twist on the UNO formula. Most of the main gameplay is the same as every other UNO game. The game’s main addition is the flex side of cards as well as the Power cards. Each player has their own Power card that they will flip from active to inactive throughout the game. Having your Power card active allows you to use the flex side of your cards. Some number cards have a second color which you can use if you use your power. The Action cards have two abilities with the flip side power generally being more powerful. You need to choose the best time to use your power abilities. The first player to get rid of all of their cards first, wins the game.

For the complete rules check out our how to play UNO Flex! post.

Mini Review: When I first heard of UNO Flex!, I was genuinely intrigued. The addition of powers which you can activate on cards sounded like a fun twist on the original game. UNO Flex! is one of the best UNO spinoff games that I have played that sticks pretty close to the original game’s formula. In fact I think I would almost always prefer playing it over the original game. Its one downside is that it is a little more complicated than the original game. That is easily offset by the game actually adding a decent amount of strategy. It is usually obvious when you should use your power, but sometimes you have to make a decision that actually has an impact on the ultimate outcome. The game does a really good job tweaking things to make things feel fresh, while still remaining pretty loyal to the original game. If the premise intrigues you at all, I would highly recommend checking out UNO Flex!.

Box for UNO Flip

UNO Flip (2009)

  • Year: 2009
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card, Dexterity
  • Number of Players: 2-6
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Flip takes the traditional UNO gameplay and adds a launching/flipping mechanic. The main gameplay is the same as the normal game. When a player plays a flip card they have the opportunity to launch their UNO guy. If they can land the UNO guy on another player’s crash pad, they get to give the other player one of their cards.

Mini Review: Before playing UNO Flip I actually had pretty high expectations for the game. Unfortunately UNO Flip doesn’t really add much to UNO. For the most part UNO Flip plays just like normal UNO. The only unique mechanic in UNO Flip is the launching mechanic and it rarely impacts the game. The mechanic doesn’t come into play very often and when it does only one card changes hands so it still doesn’t impact the game very much. The biggest problem though is that the launchers don’t really work that well. Most of the time you can only launch the UNO guys a short distance which makes it hard to land the UNO guy on the crash pads. I would only recommend picking up UNO Flip if you really like the idea of the launching mechanic and can find the game for cheap. For more information check out our full review of UNO Flip.

Box for UNO Flip

UNO Flip! (2019)

  • Year: 2019
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: In the 2019 version of UNO Flip! much of the gameplay is the same as the original game with one major twist. The goal in the game is still to get rid of all of your cards by playing cards that match the previous card’s color, number or symbol. The player who gets rid of all of their cards will score points from the cards left in the other players’ hands. The catch in UNO Flip! is that all of the cards in the game are double sided. The light side of the cards are the nicer side and are similar to the original UNO. The dark side of the cards are much more powerful. Whenever a player plays a flip card the players will flip all of the cards in the game to their other side which players will then have to play off of.

Mini Review: My first impression of UNO Flip! was that it felt like it might just be a gimmick. The idea of double sided cards was interesting, but I didn’t think it would play much of a role in the game. After playing the game though I can honestly say that UNO Flip! is arguably better than the original UNO. A large majority of the game plays exactly the same as normal UNO. The addition of double sided cards adds a surprising amount to the game though. The dark side has some new abilities which can have a big impact on the game. The biggest addition the double sided cards have on the game though is that they add a surprising amount of strategy to the game. As you can see the other side of the other players’ cards you can somewhat remember what cards the other players have should the cards get flipped over. You can use this along with other side effects from the double sided cards to implement more strategy than your typical UNO game. If you like the original UNO I would highly recommend picking up UNO Flip! as it takes the original game and improves upon it. For more information about the game check out our full review of UNO Flip!.

Box for UNO Hearts

UNO Hearts

  • Year: 1994
  • Publisher: International Games, Mattel
  • Designer: Jim Keifer
  • Genre: Trick Taking
  • Number of Players: 2-8
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Hearts is for the most part a combination of the game of Hearts with some of the special cards from UNO. The game is basically a typical trick taking game. Each round begins with a player playing a card and all of the other players playing a card of the same color if they are able to. The player who plays the highest card of the color that started the round takes all of the cards played in the round. Once thirteen rounds are played, all of the players score points for all of the hearts they collected. The player who scores the least points after a player has scored 60 points wins the game.

Mini Review: Not being much of a trick taking fan, I can’t say that I was a huge fan of UNO Hearts. I felt the game relied pretty heavily on luck and didn’t have a lot of decision making. It also didn’t help that a lot of the special cards unique to UNO Hearts actually make Hearts worse in my opinion. If you like trick taking games, Hearts in particular, it might be worth checking out UNO Hearts. Otherwise I would probably recommend passing. For more information check out my full review of UNO Hearts.

UNO House Rules

  • Year: 1998
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO House Rules was a card game that was based off a contest held by Mattel. The game uses a standard deck of UNO cards and has three variant rules that you can add to the game. Jump-In UNO adds a rule where players can play a card out of turn if they have the exact card (color and number) that is on top of the discard pile. Seven-O UNO forces players to pass their hand to the next player if certain cards are played. Finally in Progressive UNO if a player is forced to draw cards through a draw card, they can play the same card which will pass the penalty to the next player. Each additional card that is played is added to the number of cards that the player will have to draw.

Box for UNO Madness

UNO Madness

  • Year: 1995
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Jim Keifer
  • Genre: Tile Placement
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Madness is a combination of UNO and a game like Perfection. Players take turns playing tiles onto the gameboard. Tiles can be played to the board if they match the last tile’s color or number. If the timer runs out during a player’s turn, the current player draws four tiles and the game continues. If a player plays their last tile or fills in the last space the player scores points from the tiles held by the other players.

Mini Review: After playing UNO Madness it does feel like what you would get if you combined UNO with a timer mechanic similar to Perfection. Most of the mechanics in the game are the same as normal UNO except the cards have been replaced with tiles. The major difference is the addition of the gameboard which features a timer. The gameboard adds a speed element to the game as you want to finish your turn as quickly as possible so it doesn’t pop up during your turn. The additional speed element is kind of fun. The problem is that the gameboard mostly just adds more luck to the game as you don’t have much control over whether it will pop up during your turn. In a way the game is kind of fun, but the combination of the two games doesn’t work all that well. I personally would rather just play UNO or Perfection instead of trying to play a combination of both. Check out the full review of UNO Madness for more information.

Box for UNO Mario Kart

UNO Mario Kart

  • Year: 2020
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Nick Hayes
  • Genre: Card, Family
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: While UNO Mario Kart would seem like your typical UNO theme deck, it actually adds more than your typical UNO game that utilizes a popular theme. Each of the cards in the game have one of the Mario Kart items pictured on it. When you play the Wild Item Box card you will reveal the next card from the Draw Pile and take an action based on the item symbol on the card.

  • Mushroom: Take another turn.
  • Banana Peel: The previous player draws two cards.
  • Green Shell: Choose another player to draw one card.
  • Lightning: All of the players except the player who plays the card has to draw a card.
  • Bob-omb: The player who played the Wild Item Box card has to draw two cards.

Complete Rules

Mini Review: I was honestly kind of surprised by UNO Mario Kart as it different from your typical themed UNO game. Real effort went into making the game implement elements from the video game. While it is completely random how the items affect the game, it actually does a pretty good job recreating the feeling of items from the video game. If you aren’t really a fan of Mario Kart, the game won’t be for you. Fans of UNO and Mario Kart should consider checking it out though. Full Review

UNO Master

  • Year: 1997
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Master takes the original UNO and adds in a timer mechanic. Players can choose one of three time limits: eight, six, and four seconds. Each player has to play/draw a card and press the button before time runs out. If a player doesn’t press the button in time they are forced to draw four cards.

UNO Moo

  • Year: 2008
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Tyler Kenney
  • Genre: Children’s
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 3+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Moo is a version of UNO made for young children. Instead of cards the players are given animal figures. Players take turns playing figures that either match the color or animal of the figure that was played last. The game includes figures that represent skip (skunk) and wild (farmer). The first player to get rid of all of their figures first wins the game.

Box for UNO Party!

UNO Party!

  • Year: 2022
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card, Family
  • Number of Players: 6-16 (you can play the game with less players)
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy: Amazon, eBay

Description: UNO Party! is an UNO game specifically designed to be played in larger groups. The main gameplay is the same as normal UNO, but there are three new cards and a new gameplay mechanic. Unlike the original game, you can play a card out of turn if it exactly matches the number and color of the top card on the discard pile. The new cards in the game include the following:

  • Point Taken: Each player points at another player. You will draw cards equal to the number of players that point at you.
  • Wild Pile Up: The top card from the Draw Pile is revealed. This card creates a new pile that will be passed between the players. Each player in turn order must play a card that matches the color of the new pile. The first player that can’t play a card, has to add all of the cards from the pile to their hand.
  • Wild Drawn Together: The player who plays the card chooses two players who will be linked together. When one of these players are forced to draw a card(s), the other player has to draw the same number of cards.

For the complete rules check out our how to play UNO Party! post.

Mini Review: UNO Party! is basically what you would expect out of an UNO game made for larger groups. The basic gameplay is the same. The new cards mostly give players more opportunities to force other players to draw cards. I generally liked the new cards as they add interesting new things to the game. They do make games take longer though as you are forced to draw more cards. I also really liked the idea that you can play a card out of turn if it exactly matches the number and color of the last played card. The game recommends 6-16 players, but you can play the game with less players. Some of the unique cards can have some weird quirks with less players though. Ultimately I think UNO Party! is one of the better UNO spinoffs as it remains similar to the original game, but has some interesting new twists. I would actually say that it is probably better than the original game.

UNO Power Grab

  • Year: 2012
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-6
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Power Grab is similar to normal UNO but it includes four power towers. Each of the four power towers give you protection against one of the action cards. One tower protects you against draw one cards, one against draw two cards, one against wild draw four cards, and one against skip cards. The game includes special cards and number cards with a special symbol that let you take the corresponding tower. If one player ever acquires all four power towers they can immediately discard all but one of their cards.

UNO Reflex

  • Year: 2011
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Westley Ciarmella, Keith Millman
  • Genre: Card, Speed
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Reflex includes an electronic component. The normal game is played the same as the original UNO except that you must press the button on the electronic component each time you play a card. If a light appears on the device the players race to play a card of the matching color and press the button. The player who presses the button first gets to play their card and play passes to the next player. If you put the wrong color card down in front of you and press the button, you have to draw two cards.

Box for UNO Remix

UNO Remix

  • Year: 2021
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card, Family
  • Number of Players: 3-6
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Remix is what you get when you combine UNO with a legacy game. At the start of each hand a number of blank cards are drawn. Each of the players get to choose a card and write their name on it. These cards will then be added into the deck for the current game and any future games. When one of these cards are played, the player whose name is written on the card gets to take the card’s action. Complete Rules

Mini Review: UNO Remix is an interesting twist on the normal formula. The game basically plays the same as every other UNO game, but as you play it you are building a living deck customized to your group. This is a really interesting idea that actually adds some strategy to the game as the cards you choose at the beginning of a round will impact all future games. This creates a unique experience for each group that plays it. It does kind of force you to play the game with the same group every game though. If you like UNO and think this premise sounds interesting, I would check out UNO Remix. Full Review

UNO Roboto

  • Year: 2011
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Merle Robbins, Brian S. Spence
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 6+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Roboto includes a robotic electronic component. Players will use the robot to record their name and their special house rule. These recordings will be replayed during the game. Gameplay is the same as the original UNO for the most part. Occasionally the robot will interrupt the game by speaking. Players stop playing the game and perform the action that the robot says. The last player to perform the action generally has to draw cards. The first player to get rid of all of their cards wins the game.

Box for UNO Royal Revenge

UNO Royal Revenge

  • Year: 2014
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: The game includes a crown, jester hat, and royal scepter. Players will take turns as the king. Throughout the game the scepter will make a noise which indicates that the player to the left of the current king will become the new king. When a player becomes the king they get to choose the player that will be the jester. These two roles come into play for some of the special cards. Some of the cards allow the king to choose the color of a wild or which player will have to draw cards. The jester has a card that forces them to draw a card when it is played.

Mini Review: UNO Royal Revenge is one of the strangest UNO spinoff games that I have played. Much of the gameplay is exactly the same as normal UNO. In a lot of ways it feels like the game was made simpler to appeal more to younger children. The main difference is the addition of the roles of king and jester. These come into play for some of the cards as the king will get additional powers while the jester will suffer more penalties. I can see this really appealing to younger children as it adds quite a bit of silliness to the game. The problem is that it also adds considerably more luck to the game. While younger children may enjoy the game I think adults and older children will find UNO Royal Revenge to be quite boring. Check out our full review of UNO Royal Revenge for more information.

Box for UNO Rummy-Up

UNO Rummy-Up

  • Year: 1993
  • Publisher: International Games, Mattel
  • Genre: Party
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Rummy-UP is basically a combination of UNO and Rummikub. The game is played following the same rules as Rummikub except that the game includes the special actions from normal UNO. The goal is to try and get rid of all of your tiles before the other players.

Mini Review: UNO Rummy-Up is one of the more interesting UNO spinoff games. I would say that it arguably the best UNO spinoff game that I have played, and yet it has very little to do with the original UNO. Basically the game feels like the designer(s) took Rummikub and added on an UNO theme. Most of the gameplay is taken from Rummikub. This is one of the game’s greatest strengths as the gameplay is pretty simple and a lot of fun. The game relies on some luck, but there is a surprising amount of strategy to figuring out how to manipulate the tiles played to the table. UNO mostly comes into play with the addition of the special tiles. These add some variety to the game, but also add some luck. As the game is more Rummikub than UNO your opinion of Rummikub is likely going to impact your opinion of UNO Rummy-Up more than UNO. I really enjoyed the game even though that was mostly because I really like Rummikub. For more information check out our full review of UNO Rummy-Up.

Box for UNO Showdown

UNO Showdown

  • Year: 2020
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card, Electronic, Speed
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: The main addition to UNO Showdown are the showdowns. When a player plays a Showdown or Wild Showdown card, they will choose another player to complete against in a showdown. One or more cards are put inside the game unit. The start button is pressed which starts a timer. When the timer goes off, the two players in the showdown compete to press their paddle before the other player. The player who presses their paddle last has to take all of the cards from the machine and add them to their hand. Complete Rules

Mini Review: UNO Showdown is very similar to the original game. The only real difference is the addition of the showdowns. Thus your enjoyment of the game is going to rely heavily on your feelings towards them. Basically they add a speed element to the game where the player with the fastest reaction time will have to draw less cards than the other players. The showdowns are kind of fun and are a nice addition to the game. The biggest problem is that they come up too often which kind of drags down the game at times. Basically if you like UNO and the showdown idea, you will likely enjoy the game. If not, it probably won’t be for you. Complete Review

Box for UNO Spin

UNO Spin

  • Year: 2005
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Janice Ritter
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Spin takes the basic premise of UNO and adds a spinner. Gameplay is the same as normal UNO except for when a player plays a spin card. When a player plays a spin card the next player will spin the wheel and take the corresponding action. Some of the special actions include: discarding all of your cards of a certain color/number, drawing until you get a card of the corresponding color, trading hands, and several other special actions.

Mini Review: UNO Spin is a solid addition to the UNO franchise. It doesn’t drastically change the game but it is a nice distraction. The spinner doesn’t have a huge impact on the game but it feels like it compliments the main game more than taking it over. The spinner does add even more luck to UNO though.  If you are interested in an UNO game that also features a  spinner I think you will like UNO Spin. See our full review of UNO Spin for more information.

UNO Stacko

  • Year: 1994
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Jim Keifer
  • Genre: Dexterity
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 8+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Stacko is basically UNO meets Jenga. There are two different versions of UNO Stacko. The older versions of the game have players remove blocks and place them on the top of the stack based on what is rolled on a special die. The later versions remove the die and have players take a block that either matches the color or number of the previous block that was taken. The later versions also include special action blocks which work the same way as their corresponding cards from normal UNO. The player that knocks over the tower loses the game.

UNO Tiki Twist

  • Year: 2014
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: The main unique mechanic in UNO Tiki Twist is the tiki idol spinner. This game includes unique tiki face cards which can be played at any time and don’t have to match the top card on the discard pile. When a player plays a tiki card they insert it into the tiki idol spinner and then spin the spinner. The player that the spinner points towards will have to take the action corresponding to the card that was placed inside the idol. These actions include: draw one, draw two, draw four, discard two, discard all, and go to. When a player plays a card with a spin symbol on it, they will spin the idol and the chosen player will take the action of the last card added to the idol.

Box for UNO Tippo

UNO Tippo

  • Year: 2009
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card, Dexterity
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Tippo is a combination of UNO with a dexterity game. UNO Tippo plays the same as normal UNO but it includes a scale that has two discard piles. Players can play cards to either discard pile. If a player plays a card that tips over the scale, the scale is reset and the player draws two cards from the draw pile. The first player to get rid of all of their cards first wins the round. UNO Tippo includes two new cards:

  • Tilt: Players take turns adding cards from the draw pile onto the discard pile that the card was played to until someone tips over the scale.
  • Stop: When a stop card is played to a discard pile, players cannot play cards to that discard pile unless a specific card is played.

Mini Review: Before playing UNO Tippo I actually had high hopes for the game. The idea of adding a dexterity mechanic to UNO sounded interesting. I also found it interesting for an UNO game to have two discard piles. The idea of the stacking mechanic where players had to choose which discard pile they want to play a card on had potential. The problem is that none of the mechanics work as well as they should. There really is no dexterity in the game as the scale only tips over if too many cards are added to one side. The game also forces players to draw cards too often which extends the game for too long. The game has potential but could use some variant rules. If the concept sounds interesting it might be worth trying as it is a unique experience but it has issues. If you would like more information check out our full review of UNO Tippo.

Box for UNO Triple Play

UNO Triple Play

  • Year: 2021
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card, Family
  • Number of Players: 2-6
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Triple Play mostly differs from the original game due to the addition of the electronic game unit. Instead of one Discard Pile, there are three in the game. The game unit determines which of the three piles that you can play a card to on your turn. After playing a card to a pile you will press down on it. If there are too many cards on the pile (determined by the game unit randomly choosing how many cards can be played to the pile), you will have to draw cards equal to the number displayed in the middle of the game unit. The game also has a couple of new cards. One card lets you play two cards of the same color on your turn, and the others relate to the game unit. Complete Rules

Mini Review: I generally enjoyed UNO Triple Play. The game is similar to the original, but the addition of the electronic game unit is a nice addition. I liked the game unit as it works well. The idea of having three different discard piles is interesting and having to debate possibly overloading one of the piles adds an interesting element to the game. These elements do add a little more luck to the game though. If you like UNO and think the addition of the electronic game unit sounds interesting, I think you will enjoy UNO Triple Play. Full Review

Box for UNO Ultimate Marvel

UNO Ultimate Marvel

  • Year: 2022
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Aaron Weil
  • Genre: Card, Family, Take That
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Ultimate Marvel is different from most UNO games as each player controls their own deck. Each player chooses a different character and takes the corresponding deck which has its own unique emphasis. The basic gameplay is the same as every other UNO game. Where the game differs is that players will face off against enemies and have to deal with event cards. While an enemy is attacking a player, they will be impacted by its special ability. To defeat an enemy you need to play a card that matches the “to defeat” symbol(s) for the enemy. As each player has their own deck of cards, a player can be eliminated if they run out of cards.

The game currently has the following add-on packs:

  • Doctor Strange (2022)
  • Miles Morales (2022)
  • Ms. Marvel (2022)
  • Scarlett Witch (2022)
  • She-Hulk (2022)
  • Spider-man (2022)

Mini Review: In a way UNO Ultimate Marvel feels like advanced UNO. While the basic gameplay is the same, the game adds in a number of new interesting mechanics which make it more complex. The premise behind the game really intrigued me and I think the game actually succeeds at adding more strategy to UNO. There are lot of things to like about the game. It succeeds at reaching some of that potential, but doesn’t quite reach what it could have been. It is a good game, but I think it could have been better. If you are interested in the Marvel theme and are intrigued by a more complex UNO, I think you will enjoy UNO Ultimate Marvel.

UNO Ultimate Marvel Rules and Review

UNO Wild Jackpot

  • Year: 2016
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Designer: Nick Hayes, Brian Weinstock
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2-10
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Wild Jackpot is a a UNO game that utilizes a slot machine mechanic. Special cards in the game allow players to pull the lever on the slot machine. Some of the special actions on the slot machine have players draw one of the customizable rule cards, discard cards, or draw cards. UNO Wild Jackpot has three unique cards. The game has customizable rule cards which allows each player to write their own unique rule. The jackpot and wild jackpot cards allow the player who plays the card to pull the lever on the slot machine.

Box for Uno Wild Tiles

UNO Wild Tiles

  • Year: 1982
  • Publisher: International Games
  • Genre: Tile Laying
  • Number of Players: 2-4
  • Age Recommendation: 8+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: In UNO Wild Tiles players use circular tiles which contain colored numbers and arrows. Players take turns playing tiles to the gameboard. Each subsequent player has to play a tile that matches the color or number of the last played tile. The arrow on each tile indicates which space that the next tile has to be played on. When a player plays a tile on a space that contains words the player has to follow the instructions printed on the space. The first player to get rid of all of their tiles or the player with the least tiles when no more tiles can be played, wins the round.

Mini Review: When you look at UNO Wild Tiles the game actually has an interesting premise. The idea of adding a gameboard mechanic to UNO had some potential. UNO Wild Tiles feels familiar to the original game and yet feels unique at the same time. I was actually surprised that UNO Wild Tiles feels like it has more strategy than normal UNO. The problem with UNO Wild Tiles is that at times it also feels like it relies more on luck than the original game. Some tiles are really hard to get rid of and some of the instruction spaces can have a huge impact on the game. If the idea of adding a gameboard to UNO sounds interesting it may be worth taking a look at UNO Wild Tiles but I would otherwise pass on the game. Check out our full review of UNO Wild Tiles for more information.

UNO Wild Twists

  • Year: 2022
  • Publisher: Mattel
  • Genre: Card
  • Number of Players: 2+
  • Age Recommendation: 7+
  • Where You Can Buy:

Description: UNO Wild Twists is basically a standard 52 card deck of cards and eight wild cards. The game includes two Wilds, Wild Black, Wild Red, Wild Club, Wild Heart, Wild Diamond, and Wild Spade. The game includes some rules on how to alter some traditional card games like Poker, Hearts, Gin Rummy, etc. Additionally you can create your own variations on other card games.

UNO Themed Decks: The Complete List - Geeky Hobbies

Tuesday 8th of November 2022

[…] Since it’s original creation back in 1971, UNO has become one of the most successful card games of all time. With how popular the game is, it is no surprise that Mattel has tried to capitalize on its popularity over the years. This has lead to a lot of different UNO games being made. There have been a lot of spinoff variant games created which utilize the UNO theme and tweak the gameplay in new ways to try something new. Some of these are pretty good, while others make the gameplay worse. You can find our complete list of UNO spinoff variant games here. […]

UNO Showdown Card Game Review - Geeky Hobbies

Tuesday 26th of July 2022

[…] regular reader of Geeky Hobbies will know that I have taken a look at large majority of the UNO spinoff games released over the years. One of the UNO games that I had missed was UNO Showdown released back in […]

UNO Triple Play Card Game Review - Geeky Hobbies

Tuesday 21st of June 2022

[…] that we have played a lot of different UNO games over the years. UNO has had a lot of different spinoff games created over the years, and we have actually taken a look at most of them. Some are only slight […]

How to Play UNO Triple Play Card Game (Rules and Instructions) - Geeky Hobbies

Monday 20th of June 2022

[…] some version of UNO at least once in their life. The success of the franchise has lead to a lot of UNO spinoff games. One of the newest games in the franchise is UNO Triple Play which was released last year. The game […]

UNO Dare! Card Game Review - Geeky Hobbies

Saturday 28th of May 2022

[…] that we have reviewed quite a few different UNO games. In fact we even have a post about all of the various UNO games that have been released over the years. While UNO is not a perfect game, I have always had a soft […]

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