Contact Us

Contact Us

At Geeky Hobbies, our goal is to review and curate everything fun that is out there. Whether it is a board or card game, TV show, movie, puzzle, video game, or a new hobby or interest; we are interested in reviewing and curating anything we can get our hands on. From small indie releases to blockbuster media, we try to cover it all as best as we can. If you would like us to cover your product or piece of entertainment, feel free to drop us an e-mail. Since we are interested in almost all genres, types of media, hobbies, and interests we will most likely be willing to cover your product but we still prefer you e-mail us to make sure it is a good fit for the blog. You can e-mail us at mort(at)geekyhobbies.com (make sure to change the (at) to an @ symbol). Also feel free to e-mail us any news, press releases, questions, comments, or anything else at the same address.

For reviews and previews, we will be as fair as possible but of course we cannot guarantee a positive review. We can, however, guarantee that the review or preview will be fair. In every review and preview we do, we make sure to talk about everything we like about the product as well as the things we didn’t like or think could be improved. We will always bring up the positives but if we don’t like the product we will have to be honest with our readers.

Special notes:

  • For board, card, role-playing, outdoor, and other types of games: We accept almost all games regardless of whether they are print and play, prototypes, or final versions of the game. However, we prefer that you e-mail us when the game’s rules are mostly finalized and you have a semi-concrete release date (a Kickstarter date or a date when the game will be available for purchase). Basically, as long as the game is near completion (not in the testing stages) feel free to e-mail us whenever you like. Games that are complete (or near completion) will be reviewed while print and play, prototypes, and games that aren’t quite complete will be previewed (since it isn’t fair to give a final numerical grade to an unfinished product).
  • For video games: We love all types of games from small indie games to big releases. Feel free to send codes for games you would like us to cover to mort(at)geekyhobbies.com. Just know that since there are hundreds of games released each week, we can’t get to all of them and thus can’t guarantee coverage (or when we might cover your game). However, if we like your game we will make sure to cover it in some way. We can cover games on the following platforms: PC, Wii U, PS3, Xbox 360, 3DS, Android, and most older platforms.
  • For movies, documentaries, TV shows, anime, and other media: We accept DVDs, Blu-rays, screener copies (both physical and online screeners), as well as links to freely and legally available media (free documentaries and other media on YouTube, Vimeo, etc.).
  • For puzzles, hobby stuff, collectibles, other types of entertainment, and anything else you think we might be interested in: Drop us an e-mail to see if your product is a good fit for the blog. We are always willing to try new things and will probably be interested in trying out your product.

40 thoughts on “Contact Us

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  • September 13, 2017 at 7:28 pm
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    Ive been searching forever for a game for my mom that she played as a child. The game consiste of an hexagonal or octagonal shaped tower with holes in it. Each player had a certain amount if marble or something similar with hole all over it. Each player has 2 sticks. They use thw stick to work the marble to the top and over into the opponents side. 1st to do so is the winner. The opponent can also use their sticks to move your marbles back to your side. She played it in 1st ir 2nd grade and she was birn in 1965. If you could help me find this game i would appreciate it. Dont know what else to do ive been looking for years. Thanks!

    Reply
    • September 14, 2017 at 10:49 am
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      Hello.

      Off the top of my head I am not familiar with the game you are talking about since it was from before my time. After a little research I did find the 1971 board game Hurry Up. The game seems to have a lot of the things that you are talking about but it doesn’t seem to exactly fit your description. If this is not the game you are talking about I would need some more information to help you such as a date, manufacturer, or any other distinguishing features.

      If you don’t have any more information about the game I would recommend leaving a comment in the forums on Board Game Geek.com. Board Game Geek has the largest collection of information about different board games on the internet and it has a lot of users that might be able to help you figure out what the game is.

      I am sorry that I couldn’t be of more help.

      Eric

      Reply
  • February 22, 2018 at 7:50 pm
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    The 1962 Bop the Beetle made by Ideal company. I own a complete Bop the Beetle. It has “blue’ bays or boppers. Is this rare. I have only seen them in orange. Next I have collecting the 1949 Cootie game made by Schaper company. When did the come out with the colors like orange, brown, meginta, dark purple, and maroon ? E-mail me back please

    Reply
    • February 23, 2018 at 5:25 pm
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      I am not sure how much I am going to be able to help you with your questions.

      Before reading your comment I had never heard of the board game Bop the Beetle. For more information about the game I would maybe consider asking a question on Board Game Geek since users who are more familiar with the game may be able to answer your question.

      While I am more familiar with Cootie I am not going to really be able to give you a good answer either. Cootie is a game where the component colors seemed to change quite a bit. I am not sure when certain colors were used though. For a more specific answer I would recommend asking a question on Board Game Geek to see if a user is more familiar with how the colors of the pieces changed.

      Generally when it comes to colors in older board games, the uniformity of the colors can differ quite a bit in some games. I have encountered some older games from the same year that contain different colored components. I attribute this the the lower quality control standards for board games from those eras. The publishers were more worried about the game having all of the necessary components to play the game than what colors they were. I am guessing some companies just used whatever colors they had available to make the components. To know exactly which colors components were at certain times you would probably have to find an expert of those particular games and I wouldn’t classify myself as an expert on either game you mentioned.

      I am sorry that I couldn’t be of more help.

      Reply
  • March 13, 2018 at 5:53 pm
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    I recently bought the Cool Moves games and after reading the directions I am perplexed at two things that I do not find addressed on the instruction. They are:
    *What are the numbers for that are located at the bottom of the card?
    *If “Solution: (4 Moves)” means this is what it takes to solve the problem , this isn’t always true if you only count one jump as a move
    Help!

    Reply
    • March 13, 2018 at 6:23 pm
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      I think the number near the bottom on the front of the card is just the card’s number. I don’t think the number is really used for anything other than being able to quickly reference each card which I am guessing was mostly used to reference what cards were missing from the game when talking to someone from Discovery Toys.

      For your second question I think if you use the same penguin for multiple jumps in a row it only counts as one move.

      Unfortunately I don’t have my copy of the game in front of me right now though and I haven’t played it in quite a while so these answers are based on what I remember of the game.

      Reply
  • March 21, 2018 at 10:13 pm
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    i need instruction for the Sculpture 3D Vertical Clock Puzzle Jigsaw

    Reply
    • March 22, 2018 at 11:25 am
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      Unfortunately I don’t own that puzzle so I don’t have access to the instructions. I really couldn’t find anything about it online either. Do you know the company that made the puzzle? If I knew what company made the puzzle I may be able to find something that can help you.

      Reply
  • March 25, 2018 at 5:18 pm
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    I just found this website!!! THANKS SO MUCH!!!!! I used it for the tv premiers but will come back for all hobbies and games too!!!

    Reply
  • April 21, 2018 at 3:21 pm
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    I have a game from PET toy of N.H. Called the Sulky Racing game. It’s in the original box albeit not very good condition but seems to have all playing pieces in good condition. It has a playing mat, 7 horses 5 dice, paper play money, player cards and instructions. Any idea of the value or are you interested in buying?

    Reply
    • April 22, 2018 at 10:21 am
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      Hello.

      I looked up both PET Toy and Sulky Racing and didn’t find anything about either. I was wondering if the game has a year printed on it as its age could help in determining its value? Also I am assuming this is a horse racing game where you roll the dice to move the horses?

      As I couldn’t find a lot of information about the game, this leads me to believe that the game was a locally produced game. I can see this as both a good and bad thing for the game’s value. With the game likely being locally produced it probably means that there weren’t a lot of copies of the game made. This likely will make the game rarer which would generally make the game more valuable. The one problem with the game being locally produced is that the game is not likely to be well known which means that there probably aren’t a lot of people looking for the game. If a lot of people aren’t looking for the game it will hurt the game’s value. The box not being in great condition will hurt the game’s value but the components being in good condition will help the game’s value.

      Without more information about the game I can’t really give you a good estimation of the game’s value. The value likely is going to come down to whether people know about the game and if they want it.

      I am sorry that I couldn’t be of more help.

      Reply
  • May 11, 2018 at 9:22 am
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    Games for teenagers and adults learning English. Any ideas or suggestions?
    I teach English as a foreign language and students love playing games, in English, to help them learn.
    I’m not a ‘geeky’ game player myself so this fantastic site is a great source of inspiration. I’d be very grateful for any advice or suggestions anyone has for games suitable for English language learners, bearing in mind the following:

    I can have classes of around 20, will typically split class into four or five groups of 4 – 6 students. each group plays a game for 20 – 30 minutes, then changes to play a different game. So games need to be:

    Very easy to pick up and understand what to do, I don’t have time to explain complex instructions.

    Have lots of interaction between players especially speaking

    Fairly quick to complete

    Suitable for 2+ players

    If they’re portable, this is a bonus

    So far, I’ve used Bananagrams, Dobble, Yes No and several others with great success

    Reply
    • May 11, 2018 at 5:19 pm
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      Hello.

      If you are looking for word games one game that is a little older that I would recommend is Word on the Street. The game mostly focuses on spelling words but it is pretty straightforward.

      If you want to see our highest rated games you can check out this page or if you want to browse games by genre you can check out this page.

      While this video was not created by me I would recommend checking out this video. I generally agree with Tom Vasel’s opinions of board games and he actually has experience teaching English as a second language.

      Reply
  • May 17, 2018 at 11:05 am
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    Thanks very much, youtube link was especially useful.

    Reply
  • June 4, 2018 at 6:25 pm
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    Hi I was cleaning out my my house a came across one of my kids out games
    it is unopened ,it is pokemon master trainer Martre dresseur
    any info and value thoughts would be great
    thank you
    steve tretick

    Reply
    • June 5, 2018 at 11:42 am
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      I am assuming this is the Canadian version of the game with it having both the English and French title? I don’t see it being the Canadian version really impacting the value much if at all but I would mention it if you plan on selling it.

      Well the good news is that Pokemon Master Trainer is a game that is actually quite valuable. There have been three different versions of the game made over the years. The oldest version (1999 black box) (more info) is currently around $100 on Amazon. The second version (2001 red box) (more info) is technically $600 on Amazon right now but I think the current value is the case of someone just hoping someone will pay way above market value. I personally think it would actually sell closer to $100-200. The third version (2005 red box) (more info) is around $50-60. On eBay the two older versions sell for around $70-100 while the third version sells for around $30-40. With the game sealed (as long as the box is not in bad shape) I think you could add 50-100% more to those prices.

      Pokemon Master Trainer is one of those rare newer board games that actually have gone up in value. I think this is due to the fact that Pokemon is still popular to this day and these games are somewhat rare. While you might not be able to sell the game right away, there will be a market for the game so you should be able to get at least $100 if it is one of the first two versions of the game.

      Reply
  • July 8, 2018 at 11:06 pm
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    Where can I locate a list of Tiger Electronics games that used the Texas Instruments TMS1000 chips?
    and/or a forum that discusses Tiger.

    Thankyou

    Reply
    • July 10, 2018 at 11:28 am
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      Unfortunately I really can’t help you as I don’t have an answer to either of your questions.

      Reply
  • July 18, 2018 at 2:15 pm
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    hi i need the uk rules for dealers choice can you help

    Reply
    • July 18, 2018 at 4:22 pm
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      As there have been two different games with the name Dealer’s Choice made, I am not sure which one you are looking for. If you are inquiring about the 1954 game I unfortunately can’t help you. As far as the 1972 version of the game I have posted a review of the game on this website which includes an explanation on how to play the game. The rules are based off the US version of the game though. I quickly checked Board Game Geek and I didn’t see people talking about any differences between the US and UK version outside of some thematic changes (cars have different names, different currency, etc.) so I would assume you could use the rules I posted to play the UK version of the game. I hope this helps you.

      Reply
  • August 16, 2018 at 7:39 pm
    Permalink

    hello and greetings from Greece

    I was looking in Tiger Electronics list of games, and i saw that Streets of Rage isnt being included.
    I am searching all over the internet for this and still havent found any reliable information.
    I own it in NIB condition and i d like to know its value

    Could you help me out?
    best regards
    Nikos

    Reply
  • October 15, 2018 at 4:09 pm
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    I have about 15 game boards (NOT board games) that date from the 1920s to the ‘40s. Some are framed in glass, others are just the board. All are in fair condition. Can they be sold on this site? If not, do you have a site to suggest? I received them from a friend who knows I like the looks of them, but I’m in my 60s and can use a few bucks rather than look at them any longer.

    Reply
    • October 15, 2018 at 5:38 pm
      Permalink

      Unfortunately you won’t be able to sell them on this site as we don’t have a store or auction feature. I won’t be able to give you specific prices for your game boards, as the prices are more likely to vary as some people will be turned off by the game’s missing the rest of the components. If you want to give me a list of which boards you have and dates (if printed on the board), I can give you a quick opinion on which ones I think would be most valuable.

      Depending on what games they are, I could see some of them being worth something even without the other components. If the game boards are for rarer/unknown games I would guess they would be worth more than a game that is still in production today, especially if you don’t need any special components to play the game.

      As far as suggestions on where you can sell the game boards it is somewhat going to depend on how rare they are. You could always sell them on eBay but you tend not to get as much for them as other websites. If you are patient you could get more but you might have to wait a while for someone who is really interested in the game board. Board Game Geek has an auction/store where you could list the game boards. I am not sure how many people would be interested in just the game boards. There are a lot of board game collectors on the website but they are usually more interested in actually playing the games so they might not be interested in just the boards. Your third option might be to go to a local auction house/antique store and see what they think. Unfortunately I am not particularly familiar with any auction sites on the internet that specialize in board games.

      I hope this was helpful.

      Reply

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